Home » Radio Hobbies: Citizens Band Radio, TV and FM DX, CB Radio in the United Kingdom, Digital Radio Mondiale, Shortwave Listening, Scann by Source Wikipedia
Radio Hobbies: Citizens Band Radio, TV and FM DX, CB Radio in the United Kingdom, Digital Radio Mondiale, Shortwave Listening, Scann Source Wikipedia

Radio Hobbies: Citizens Band Radio, TV and FM DX, CB Radio in the United Kingdom, Digital Radio Mondiale, Shortwave Listening, Scann

Source Wikipedia

Published September 4th 2011
ISBN : 9781156863039
Paperback
46 pages
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 About the Book 

Please note that the content of this book primarily consists of articles available from Wikipedia or other free sources online. Pages: 45. Chapters: Citizens band radio, TV and FM DX, CB radio in the United Kingdom, Digital Radio Mondiale, ShortwaveMorePlease note that the content of this book primarily consists of articles available from Wikipedia or other free sources online. Pages: 45. Chapters: Citizens band radio, TV and FM DX, CB radio in the United Kingdom, Digital Radio Mondiale, Shortwave listening, Scanner, Family Radio Service, Vintage amateur radio, Tropospheric propagation, CB usage in the United States, DXing, MW DX, QSL, PMR446, F2 propagation, Aircheck, LowFER, Chicago Area Radio Monitoring Association, EQSO. Excerpt: Citizens Band radio (often shortened to CB radio) is, in many countries, a system of short-distance radio communications between individuals on a selection of 40 channels within the 27-MHz (11 m) band. The CB radio service is distinct from FRS, GMRS, MURS, or Amateur (ham) Radio. In many countries, CB does not require a license and, unlike Amateur Radio, it may be used for business as well as personal communications. Like many other two-way radio services, Citizens Band channels are shared by many users. Only one station may transmit at a time. Other stations must listen and wait for the shared channel to be available. Over time, several countries have created similar radio services, with varying requirements for licensing and differing technical standards. While they may be known by other names, such as General Radio Service in Canada, they often use similar frequencies (26 to 28 MHz), and have similar uses, and similar difficulties with antennas and propagation. Licenses may be required, but eligibility is generally simple. Some countries have personal radio services in the UHF band, such as the European PMR446 and the Australian UHF CB. The Citizens Band radio service originated in the United States as one of several personal radio services regulated by the Federal Communications Commission (FCC). These services began in 1945 to permit citizens a radio band for personal communication (e.g., radio-controlled models, family communications, individual businesses). In 1948, t...