Home » New Testament Books (Book Guide): Book of Revelation, Gospel of Matthew, Gospel of Luke, Acts of the Apostles, Gospel of Mark by Books LLC
New Testament Books (Book Guide): Book of Revelation, Gospel of Matthew, Gospel of Luke, Acts of the Apostles, Gospel of Mark Books LLC

New Testament Books (Book Guide): Book of Revelation, Gospel of Matthew, Gospel of Luke, Acts of the Apostles, Gospel of Mark

Books LLC

Published August 31st 2011
ISBN : 9781157116561
Paperback
52 pages
Enter the sum

 About the Book 

Please note that the content of this book primarily consists of articles available from Wikipedia or other free sources online. Commentary (books not included). Pages: 50. Chapters: Book of Revelation, Gospel of Matthew, Gospel of Luke, Acts of theMorePlease note that the content of this book primarily consists of articles available from Wikipedia or other free sources online. Commentary (books not included). Pages: 50. Chapters: Book of Revelation, Gospel of Matthew, Gospel of Luke, Acts of the Apostles, Gospel of Mark, Epistle to the Hebrews, Gospel of John, First Epistle to the Thessalonians, Epistle to the Galatians, First Epistle of Peter, Epistle to the Philippians, First Epistle to the Corinthians, Epistle to the Romans, Epistle to the Ephesians, Epistle of James, First Epistle of John, Second Epistle of Peter, Epistle of Jude, Second Epistle of John, Third Epistle of John, Second Epistle to the Corinthians, Epistle to the Colossians, Epistle to Titus, Epistle to Philemon, First Epistle to Timothy, Second Epistle to the Thessalonians, Second Epistle to Timothy. Excerpt: The Gospel According to John (Greek ), commonly referred to as the Gospel of John or simply John, is an account of the public ministry of Jesus. It begins with the witness and affirmation by John the Baptist and concludes with the death, burial, Resurrection, and post-Resurrection appearances of Jesus. This account is fourth of the canonical gospels, after the synoptics Matthew, Mark and Luke. The Gospels authorship is anonymous. Its states it derives from the testimony of the disciple whom Jesus loved. Along with Peter, the unnamed disciple is especially close to Jesus, and early-church tradition identified him as John the Apostle, one of Jesus Twelve Apostles. The gospel is closely related in style and content to the three surviving Epistles of John such that commentators treat the four books together, yet, according to most modern scholars, John was not the author of any of these books. Raymond E. Brown did pioneering work to trace the development of the tradition from which the gospel arose. The discourses seem to be concerned with the actual issues of the church-and-synagogue debate at the time when th...